Best essential oils for summer

Best Essential oils for Summer and the Silly Season

Summer’s almost here and on top of that it’s the silly season, and the kids are about to be off school for 8 weeks! So here’s my top tips for surviving the heat, the crowds, and your kids with your sanity intact! I recorded a Facebook live from my Facebook page for you, otherwise below the video I will outline my top tips.

 

 

Christmas Tips:

Beat the bloating and “overfull” feeling after your Christmas feast with DigestZen Essential Oil.  It’s comprise of Anise, Peppermint, Ginger, Caraway, Coriander, Tarragon and Fennel Essential oils and helps your body digest that abundance of alcohol and food. You can place one drop in a glass of water if you enjoy the licorice and aniseed flavours, diffuse in your diffuser or rub onto your abdomen. For children and those with sensitive skin always dilute in a tablespoon of fractionated coconut oil.

Balance Essential oil is fantastic to keep you and the kids and the entire family calm during Christmas shopping!

Get your skin beach ready!

Grapefruit and Cypress Essential oils are your best friend. Grapefruit helps smash out those lumps and dimples in your legs, and Cypress works wonders with those veins.  My favourite thing to do is to make up my own body scrub with raw sugar, 10 drops of essential oil and enough coconut oil to cover and mix through. I keep it in a sealed container in the bathroom and scrub my legs before shaving- it makes my legs all nice and lubricated, so I don’t have to use soap on my legs.  If you prefer, doTERRA has a gorgeous body scrub in the Day Spa collection which is made with Bergamot essential oil.

 

Get prepared for the great outdoors!

Lavender is your best friend for bites, stings, burns and sunburn and blemishes. Apply directly to the source of irritation.  Terramour is our special blend of essential oils which you can use instead of those nasty chemical laden DDT bug sprays. It comes in a 15ml bottle or in a spray bottle for easy application. This is a blend of fractionated coconut oil, Ylang Ylang, Tiamnu seed oil, Nootka Oil, Catnip Oil, Litsea Oil, Arborvitae Oil, Lemon Eucalyptus oil, and Vanilla Bean extract.

 

 

 

To purchase any of the products mentioned in the video click below and follow the instructions

best essential oils for summer

 

 

seasonal affective disorder

Essential oils for Seasonal Affective Disorder

Essential oils for Seasonal Affective Disorder

Does Seasonal Affective Disorder get you down in autumn and winter? Don’t be SAD, let me help you. It’s not uncommon to feel a little blue when the hot bright sunny days give way to rain, and cold grey days and snow. Seasonal Affective Disorder is common and characterised by changes in emotional health. Most people may feel that they just don’t feel like their usual self, and lose interest in their hobbies, without realising what is causing it.

Robert Tisserand describes the symptoms as “difficulty waking up in the morning, nausea, tendency to oversleep and overeat, cravings for carbohydrates, lack of energy, difficulty concentrating or completing tasks, withdrawal from friends, family and social activities and decreased sex drive. While sharing many symptoms with clinical depression, the main distinguishing factor of SAD is its seasonal character.”

Essential oils are a powerful tool for dealing with Seasonal Affective Disorder because our sense of smell involves our olfactory system.  The olfactory system is linked to our limbic system which helps us create changes in emotional state.

How does the olfactory system work?

Let’s not get too complicated- a simple video will explain to you how your body uses your nose to smell, and how what you breathe aromatically can create direct changes in the body:

Essential oils stimulate the brain to exert neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine helping combat Seasonal Affective Disorder

In a 2013 article, researchers at Xiamen University, China, commented: “Most studies, as well as clinically applied experience, have indicated that various essential oils, such as lavender, lemon and bergamot can help to relieve stress, anxiety, depression and other mood disorders. Most notably, inhalation of essential oils can communicate signals to the olfactory system and stimulate the brain to exert neurotransmitters (e.g. serotonin and dopamine) thereby further regulating mood.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23531112.

Research has shown that citrus essential oils have a positive effect on boosting mood.

Robert Tisserand continues:

Many studies have found that vaporized citrus oils are particularly effective for mood enhancement. In one, a mixture of bergamot, orange and lemon (with lemon predominating) was slowly vaporized throughout the day over a two-week period, and depressed patients exposed to this fragrance were able to reduce their dose of antidepressants (Komori et al 1995).

Bergamot and lemon oils are among the most widely-researched for positive effects on mood. Rodent studies show that lemon oil is antidepressant (Komori et al 1995) and invigorating (Komori et al 2006). It also reduces anxiety and boosts both serotonin and dopamine (Komiya et al 2006), two neurochemicals that are often reduced in SAD. In addition to lemon oil, other essential oils that positively impact dopamine and/or serotonin, and are also antidepressant, include clary sage, Atlas cedarwood, eucalyptus globulus and orange (Costa et al 2013, Kako et al 2008, Martins et al 2015, Seol et al 2010)

 

seasonal affective disorder

 

Which citrus essential oils are good for Seasonal Affective Disorder?

  • Lemon
  • Lime,
  • Orange
  • Kumquat
  • Mandarin
  • Petitgrain
  • Neroli
  • Grapefruit
  • Bergamot
  • Tangerine

Other essential oils for Seasonal Affective Disorder:

  • Jasmine
  • Lavender
  • Sandalwood
  • Rose
  • Clary Sage
  • Litsea (otherwise known as May Chang)
  • Eucalyptus
  • Cedarwood

Helpful blends for Seasonal Affective Disorder:

  • Cheer (Wild Orange Peel, Clove Bud, Star Anise Fruit/Seed, Lemon Myrtle Leaf, Nutmeg Kernel, Vanilla Bean Extract, Ginger Rhizome, Cinnamon Bark, Zdravetz Herb)
  • Motivate (Peppermint Plant, Clementine Peel, Coriander Seed, Basil Herb, Yuzu Peel, Melissa Leaf, Rosemary Leaf, Vanilla Bean Absolute)
  • Elevation (Lavandin Flower, Lavender Flower, Hawaiian Sandalwood, Tangerine Peel, Melissa Flower, Ylang Ylang Flower, Elemi Resin, Osmanthus Flower, and Lemon Myrtle Leaf essential oils)
  • Citrus Bliss (Wild Orange Peel, Lemon Peel, Grapefruit Peel, Mandarin Peel, Bergamot Peel, Tangerine Peel, Clementine Peel essential oils and Vanilla Bean Absolute)
  • Sunny Citrus (Grapefruit, Wild Orange and Peppermint)

How to use essential oils to feel uplifted rather than SAD this winter:

  • For portable support, use the essential oils on a piece of aromatherapy diffuser jewellery such as lava bead bracelets and earrings and necklaces.
  • When at home, diffuser using a diffuser- 4-6 drops in a diffuser should be enough. Diffuse as required.
  • Use “touch” rollerballs, portable roll on versions of the essential oils, which have been diluted in fractionated coconut oil for ease of application. Wear it like a perfume and apply to pulse points when required.

seasonal affective disorder

To purchase these essential oils, and a diffuser so that you can diffuser the aroma in your home and workplace, click on the image below.

 

seasonal affective disorder

 

  • Please note that these are the reference articles provided by Robert Tisserand on his website.

Bradley, B., Starkey, N., Brown, S., & Lea, R. (2007). The effects of prolonged rose odor inhalation in two animal models of anxiety. Physiology & Behavior92, 931–938.

Chang, K.-M., & Shen, C.-W. (2011). Aromatherapy benefits autonomic nervous system regulation for elementary school faculty in taiwan. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : eCAM2011, 1–7.

Costa, C., & Cury, T. (2013). Citrus aurantium L. essential oil exhibits anxiolytic-like activity mediated by 5-HT1A-receptors and reduces cholesterol after repeated oral treatment. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine42, 1–10.

Goes, T., & Antunes, F. (2012). Effect of sweet orange aroma on experimental anxiety in humansThe Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine18(8), 798–804.

Gupta, A., Sharma, P. K., Garg, V. K., Singh, a. K., & Mondal, S. C. (2013). Role of serotonin in seasonal affective disorderEuropean Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences17(1), 49–55.

Haze, S., Sakai, K., & Gozu, Y. (2002). Effects of fragrance inhalation on sympathetic activity in normal adults. The Japanese Journal of Pharmacology90(3), 247–253.

Heuberger, E., Hongratanaworakit, T., & Buchbauer, G. (2006). East Indian Sandalwood and alpha-Santalol odor increase physiological and self-rated arousal in humans. Planta Medica72, 792–800.

Jafarzadeh, M., Arman, S., & Pour, F. (2013). Effect of aromatherapy with orange essential oil on salivary cortisol and pulse rate in children during dental treatment: A randomized controlled clinical trial. Advanced Biomedical Research2, 1–10.

Kako, H., Fukumoto, S., Kobayashi, Y., & Yokogoshi, H. (2008). Effects of direct exposure of green odour components on dopamine release from rat brain striatal slices and PC12 cells. Brain Research Bulletin75, 706–712.

Komiya, M., Takeuchi, T., & Harada, E. (2006). Lemon oil vapor causes an anti-stress effect via modulating the 5-HT and DA activities in mice. Behavioural Brain Research172, 240–249.

Komori, T., Fujiwara, R., & Tanida, M. (1995). Effects of citrus fragrance on immune function and depressive states. Neuroimmunomodulation2, 174–180.

Komori, T., Fujiwara, R., Tanida, M., & Nomura, J. (1995). Potential antidepressant effects of lemon odor in rats. European Neuropsychopharmacology5, 477–480.

Lee, K.B., Cho, E., & Kang, Y.S. (2014). Changes in 5-hydroxytryptamine and cortisol plasma levels in menopausal women after inhalation of clary sage oil. Phytotherapy Research28(11), 1599–1605.

Lehrner, J., Marwinski, G., & Lehr, S. (2005). Ambient odors of orange and lavender reduce anxiety and improve mood in a dental office. Physiology & Behavior86, 92–95.

Levitan, R. D. (2007). The chronobiology and neurobiology of winter seasonal affective disorder. Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience9(3), 315–324.

Liu, S., Lin, T., & Chang, K. (2013). The physical effects of aromatherapy in alleviating work-related stress on elementary school teachers in Taiwan. Evidence-Based Bomplementary and Alternative Medicine2013, 1–7.

Martinez, A., & Gonzalez-Trujano, M. (2013). Antinociceptive effect and GC/MS analysis of Rosmarinus officinalis L. essential oil from its aerial parts. Planta Medica75, 508–511.

Martins, D.F., Emer, A.A., Batisti, A.P. et al (2015). Inhalation of Cedrus atlantica essential oil alleviates pain behavior through activation of descending pain modulation pathways in a mouse model of postoperative pain. Journal of Ethnopharmacology175, 30–38.

Moss, M., Cook, J., Wesnes, K., & Duckett, P. (2003). Aromas of rosemary and lavender essential oils differentially affect cognition and mood in healthy adults. International Journal of Neuroscience113(1), 15–38.

Moss, M., & Oliver, L. (2012). Plasma 1,8-cineole correlates with cognitive performance following exposure to rosemary essential oil aroma. Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology2(3), 103–113.

Negoias, S., Croy, I., Gerber, J., Puschmann, S., Petrowski, K., Joraschky, P., & Hummel, T. (2010). Reduced olfactory bulb volume and olfactory sensitivity in patients with acute major depression. Neuroscience169(1), 415–421.

Ni, C., Hou, W., Kao, C., & Chang, M. (2013). The anxiolytic effect of aromatherapy on patients awaiting ambulatory surgery: a randomized controlled trial. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine2013, 1–5.

Peng, S., Koo, M., & Yu, Z. (2009). Effects of music and essential oil inhalation on cardiac autonomic balance in healthy individuals. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine15(1), 53–57.

Postolache, T.T., Doty, R.L., Wehr, T.A. et al (1999). Monorhinal odor identification and depression scores in patients with seasonal affective disorderJournal of Affective Disorders56(1), 27–35.

Postolache, T.T., Wehr, T.A., Doty, R.L. et al (2002). Patients with seasonal affective disorder have lower odor detection thresholds than control subjects. Archives of General Psychiatry59(12), 1119–1122.

Sayowan, W., Siripornpanich, V., Hongratanaworakit, T. et al (2013). The effects of jasmine oil inhalation on brain wave activities and emotionsJournal of Health Research27(2), 73–77.

Schablitzky, S., & Pause, B. M. (2014). Sadness might isolate you in a non-smelling world: olfactory perception and depression. Frontiers in Psychology5(45).

Seol, G., Shim, H., Kim, P., & Moon, H. (2010). Antidepressant-like effect of Salvia sclarea is explained by modulation of dopamine activities in rats. Journal of Ethnopharmacology130(1), 187–190.

Watanabe, E., Kimura, M., & Rauwald, W. (2015). Effects of Bergamot (Citrus bergamia (Risso) Wright & Arn.) essential oil aromatherapy on mood states, parasympathetic nervous system activity, and salivary cortisol levels in 41 healthy femalesForschende Komplementärmedizin22, 43–49.